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7.1. The \chapter command

To begin a new chapter, use a command of one of these forms:

\chapter{CHAPTER TITLE}
\chapter[SHORT TITLE]{CHAPTER TITLE}

Use all capital letters in the CHAPTER TITLE. If it is necessary to break lines, use “\\” commands between lines.

If you use the first form, the CHAPTER TITLE will appear in the table of contents. If you would like the title in the table of contents to be shorter than the full title, use the second form, specifying the SHORT TITLE as the optional first argument.

Examples:

\chapter{PREPARATION OF DRIED CORN USING A METATE, WITH A
      DISCOURSE ON THE GEOLOGY OF METATES}
\chapter%
[PREPARATION OF DRIED CORN]%
{%
  PREPARATION OF DRIED CORN USING A METATE, WITH A
  DISCOURSE ON THE GEOLOGY OF METATES%
}%

The Graduate Office allows you to have two special, unnumbered chapters. You may have a chapter entitled INTRODUCTION before the numbered chapters. You may also have a CONCLUSION chapter after the numbered chapters. In this case, use the \chapter* form of the command. Here is an example:

\chapter*{INTRODUCTION}
  …
\chapter{TRAINS}
  …
\chapter{BOATS}
  …
\chapter{PLANES}
  …
\chapter*{CONCLUSION}
  …

In the above example, the TRAINS chapter would be numbered 1, the PLANES chapter would be numbered 3, and the INTRODUCTION and CONCLUSION chapters would not be numbered.