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Department of
Communication, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences

Course Catalogue, and Writing & Music Programs

 

Undergraduate Courses | Graduate Courses| Writing Program | Music Program

 

Undergraduate Courses

Anthropology | Art History | Communication | English & Literature | French | German | History | Humanities | Music & Music Performance | Philosophy | Political Science | Social Science | Spanish | Technical Communication | Theater | Women’s and Gender Studies


Anthropology Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 4: Social Sciences of the General Education Core Curriculum


ANTH 101, Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the science of cultural Anthropology, its terminology, theory practice and subject matter. Students are encouraged to engage with other cultures to find similarities and connections, not differences and separation. Studies human beings, their social and cultural institutions, beliefs, and practices around the world and next door, creating a medley of adaptations to common problems.


ANTH 120, Social Thought

Credit Hours: 3
From Machiavelli and Marx to Steinem and Foucault, this course explores some of the major historical and contemporary theoretical works and authors in selected social sciences. The focus is on the cultural framework in which these thoughts emerged and the impact they had on society. (Same asWGS 120 and SS 120)


ANTH 302, Food and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Food is more than just nutrition; in every culture, past and present, food is central to building and maintaining economic and political systems, social relationships among family members and between friends and enemies, religious taboos, ethnic identities, and gender norms. The trade in food stuffs is at the heart of colonization and globalization; the lack of food is at the heart of labor migrations and horrors of malnutrition and starvations; and the science of food causes biogenetic engineering to choose between creating profit for some or life for many. This class examines these issues,ranging from seemingly universal meals to mass‐produced hamburgers, and counting the human, animal, and environmental costs of each.


ANTH 303, Race and Ethnic Relations

Credit Hours: 3
An overview of most “racial” and ethnic groups of Americans. Provides a theoretical framework to explore their histories and critical current issues and a space to enjoy the advantages of a multicultural philosophy. Focuses on the heterogeneous character of all ethnic groups, especially in regard to gender and class; attempts to define common issues that can only be solved in unison.


ANTH 320, Anthropology of Sex and Gender

Credit Hours: 3
A survey of the varieties of sex and gender definitions and roles in historical and contemporary human cultures. The study of sex assignment, gender definitions and roles in their association to stratified or equitable access to economic, political, and ideological resources and monopolies. Exploration of the parallels and differences between gender,race, and class. Topics include: gendered division of labor, female and male socialization, violence against women as male entertainment and female punishment, gender universals and generalities. (Same asWGS 320.)


ANTH 370, Nahuat Mythology & Anthropology

Credit Hours: 3
A study of Native language, literature, and mythology of Central America. The class explores a specific native literature in its own language and discusses an “American” worldview. Topics include the concept of a fragmented self and of multiple souls, of political community and redistribution, a quintesimal (5) and vigesimal (20) system of counting, sexuality, and the foundation of a Native philosophy. (Same as SPAN 370)


ANTH 381, Qualitative Methods

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the primary methods used in long-term qualitative data gathering, such as participant observation and deep ethnography, and in short-term applied data collection, such as focus groups and life histories. A major focus is research conducted with organizations and their culture. Students will design and execute their own research projects. (Same as WGS 381 and TC 381)


Art History Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


ART 272, Art History

Credit Hours: 3
Survey of art of the western hemisphere from prehistory to the 21st century. May incorporate an interdisciplinary approach. [NMCCNS ARTS 2113: General Education Area V]


ART 372, Issues in Art History

Credit Hours: 3
Issues, topics, or specific periods in the visual arts. May incorporate an interdisciplinary approach. Topics may include, among others, Visual and Other Arts; Modern Art; Art and Science; Literature inspired by Art; Modern Art, Sci Fi, and Film.


Communication Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


COMM 242, Public Speaking

Credit Hours: 3
A study of the principles of speech; practice in the preparation and delivery of various types of speeches, classified according to function; practice in the basic skills of oral communication; the development of poise and self-confidence. [NMCCNS COMM 1113: General Education Area I]


COMM 360, Advanced Public Speaking

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: COMM 242 or consent of instructor
Theory and practice of ethical and professional speech communication. Researching, writing and presenting professional presentations. Designing and using effective visuals, including posters and electronic presentation aids. Conducting group presentations and discussions about ethical and cross-curriculum issues in historical, cultural and workplace context.


English & Literature Courses

The following courses (except ENGL 103, 111, 112, 341) may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


Writing Program Courses:


ENGL 103, Pre‐College English

Credit Hours: 3
The basics of writing: sentence types, structure, and construction;topic sentences, paragraph development and coherence; the complete essay; grammar, usage, and punctuation. Prepares students for ENGL 111. (Does not fulfill the English portion of the General Education Core Curriculum, page 89.)

 

ENGL 111, College Writing: Exposition

Credit Hours: 3
The essentials of academic prose; techniques and mechanics of writing well; rhetorical strategies. [NMCCNS ENGL 1113: General Education Area I]


ENGL 112, College Writing: Argument and Analysis

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Engl. 111 or the equivalent passed with a C or better
A continuation of ENGL 111 with critical reading and writing; writing arguments; library research paper. [NMCCNS ENGL 1123: General Education Area I]


ENGL 341, Technical Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Engl 111 and Engl 112, or the equivalent passed with a C or better, and at least junior standing
This course emphasizes clear, accurate, and precise communication and scientific and technical information to a variety of audiences,for a variety of purposes. Students will be taught how to effectively analyze the components of writing situations and appropriately conduct research, write content in a professional, yet accessible style, incorporate visuals, organize and format documents. The course culminates with a substantial technical research report and oral presentation. In addition, students work on writing documents including memos, proposals, short reports, and instructions.

 

Literature Courses:


ENGL 120, Introduction to Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Survey of major works of poetry, short fiction, and drama in English and in translation. [NMCCNS ENGL 1013: General Education Area V]

 

ENGL 305, Communication for Multilingual Students

Credit Hours: 1 cr, 1 cl hrs
Prerequisites: At least junior standing consent of instructor
Students work on reading and responding to academic texts in English; crafting and expressing an original argument on an academic topic; and correctly summarizing, paraphrasing, and citing academic texts. Students will write and present on topics in their fields of study, provide constructive feedback on each other’s work, and practice articulating and answering questions on academic topics.

 

ENGL 311, Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The study and writing of one genre or a combination of the following genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, playwriting and screenwriting. Emphasis on reading and analyzing literature.


ENGL 312, Short Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Concentrated study of major works of short fiction written in English and in translation.

 

ENGL 315: Academic and Scientific Communication for Multilingual Students

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: At least junior standing
This course offers a more advanced introduction to language issues in writing for scientific and technical fields. Students in this class explore language use and academic genres in their fields of study and complete an extended research project on a technical topic. The course culminates in a technical research report and conference-style presentation.


ENGL 321, American Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
An historical survey of 17th, 18th, and 19th century writing, covering the Colonial, Enlightenment, and Romantic periods. Among the authors studied are Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Emily Dickinson. [NMCCNS ENGL 2513: General Education Area V]


ENGL 322, American Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
An historical survey of 19th and 20th century writing, covering Realism and Naturalism and the Modern period. Among the authors studied are Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Robert Frost, Eugene O’Neill, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Katherine Anne Porter, and James Baldwin. [NMCCNS ENGL 2523: General Education Area V].


ENGL 323, American Nature Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Survey of American nature Writers, such as Lewis and Clark, Thoreau, Edward Abbey, and Leslie Marmon Silko, with literary and philosophical analysis of their observational, documentary, rhetorical, inter-disciplinary, and self-reflective strategies to develop students’ own skills in these areas and to produce their own nature writing.(Same as PHIL 323).

 

English 324, Ecotopia: The Intersection of Science and Literature

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: ENGL 112 or consent of instructor.
Utopian literature, whether Paradise myths or novels set on an idyllic island or in the future, chronicles human aspirations for a better society. Ecotopia—a neologism coined in 1968—combines utopian desires for better relationships between humans with more recent desires and need for a better relationship with the environment. The course provides a review of utopian literature throughout history and focuses on contemporary science fiction novels and developments in architecture, technology, science, and alternative social structures.

 

ENGL 325, World Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Literature of the West from the Classics through the Renaissance. [NMCCNS ENGL 2613: General Education Area V]


ENGL 326, World Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Literature of the West from Neoclassicism to Contemporary. [NMCCNS ENGL 2623: General Education Area V]


ENGL 331, British Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
A survey of British literature from its origin through the Age of Enlightenment. Major authors studied include the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton [NMCCNS ENGL 2413: General Education Area V]


ENGL 332, British Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
A continuation of ENGL 331, this course surveys British literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is upon the major literary movements of Romanticism and Realism. [NMCCNS ENGL 2423: General Education Area V]


ENGL 352, Contemporary Latin American Novel

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or equivalent
Survey of the 20th century Latin American regional novel. How contemporary writers have portrayed the Latin American continent: social-realism, surrealism, the boom, neo-baroque, magical realism, mestizaje, social-protest, negrismo, etc. Focus on reading classical works such as Arguedas, Asturias, Castellanos, Fuentes, Roa Bastos ,Rulfo. (Same as Spanish 352)


ENGL 355, Latin American Fiction & the Arts

Credit Hours: 3
A historical journey of a multi-cultural continent. Politics, economic disparity, military dictatorship, oppression and revolutionary resistance are studied through the lens of arts and literature. The most varied styles—social-realism, surrealism,fantasy, magical-realism, etc.—complement factual history to offer an accurate picture of a cruel social reality. (Same as SPAN 355)


ENGL 357, Latin American Literature

Credit Hours: 3
A review of Latin American literary production with examples of its cultural and artistic diversity. The class examines the most important writers from Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, the Andean region and the Southern cone, and relates their poetic legacy to the social sciences and philosophy. (Same as SPAN 357)


ENGL 431, Literary Genres

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The study of a particular type of literature, its origins, characteristics, subtypes, and some of its major writers and works. Possible genres are poetry, drama, short stories, science fiction, novels, and nonfiction writing. May be repeated for credit with different genres.


ENGL 435, Major Writers

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Intensive study of the writing of a major world author or authors, such as Willa Cather, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, William Shakespeare, Mark Twain. May be repeated for credit with different writers.


ENGL 436, Issues and Themes in Literature

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Concentrated study of issues, ideas, and themes as they affect or are embodied in literature. Possible topics include, among others, Environment, Gender, Ethnicity, Travel, and Place. May be repeated for credit with different issues.


ENGL 440, Philosophical Novels

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 and at least 1 philosophy course
Exploration of the use and articulation of philosophy in novels. (Same as Phil 440)


ENGL 491, Directed Studies

Credit Hours: TBA
Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or consent of instructor


French Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


FREN 113, Elementary French I

Credit Hours: 3
Elements of French, with particular emphasis on pronunciation, through conversational materials. Stress is placed on the fundamentals of French grammar, spelling, and written expression. Supplementary readings reinforce comprehension and give additional sources for spontaneous oral expression in class discussion. [NMCCNS FREN 1113: General Education Area V]


FREN 114, Elementary French II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FREN 113 or equivalent
Continuation of FREN 113. [NMCCNS FREN 1123: General Education Area V]


FREN 215, Intermediate French I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FREN 114 or equivelent
Introduction to literary passages of easy comprehension. Translation and practice of composition, with emphasis on oral performance in class. Review of grammar through exercises.


FREN 216, Intermediate French II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: FREN 215 or equivalent
Continuation of FREN 215.


German Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


GERM 113, Elementary German I

Credit Hours: 3
Elements of German, with emphasis on the spoken language. Grammar and composition are introduced in connection with the subjects of oral practice.


GERM 114, Elementary German II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GERM 113 or equivalent
Continuation of GERM 113.


GERM 211, Intermediate German I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GERM 114 or equivalent
Expansion of skills in German language through readings in German culture, conversation, and writing. Review of German grammar.


GERM 212, Intermediate German II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: GERM 211 or equivalent
Continuation of GERM 211


History Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


HIST 131, Western Civilization I 5000 BC—1500 AD

Credit Hours: 3
Examines pivotal events in the history of the western world (primarily the European continent) from the early civilizations to the Renaissance. Explores the political, socio-economic, and cultural developments in the Fertile Crescent, ancient Greece and Rome, and medieval Europe. The course is organized in chronological and topical units, each within the framework of political geography, economy,religion, and culture.


HIST 132, Western Civilization II, 1500 AD—2000

Credit Hours: 3
Examines the political, social, economic, and cultural developments from the Reformation to the European Union. Explores the watersheds in European history that continue to shape modern politics and societies.


HIST 141, American History to 1865

Credit Hours: 3
A survey of American history from pre-contact North America to the end of the Civil War. The social, cultural, intellectual, and political history of the American people. [NMCCNS HIST 1113: General Education Area V]


HIST 142, American History since 1865

Credit Hours: 3
A continuation of HIST 141, with attention given to the rise of the United States as a world power, urbanization and industrialization, the role of the state, and civilrights movements. [NMCCNS HIST 1123: General Education Area V]


HIST 151, World History I

Credit Hours: 3
The evolution of the major Eurasian civilizations from the beginning of historical times to the beginning of the 16th century, with special reference to social, political, and cultural developments.


HIST 152, World History II

Credit Hours: 3
A continuation of HIST 151, emphasizing social, political, and cultural developments in Eurasian civilization from 1500 to the present.


HIST 161, Europe in the 19th Century 1815‐1914

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the major developments and themes in nineteenth century European history, including major international developments such as the Congress System, the Revolutions of 1848, the advance of modern ideologies and major trends in arts and sciences, and the causes of World War I.


HIST 162, Europe in the 20th Century, 1914‐2000

Credit Hours: 3
Explores the great watersheds of the last century in Europe,from World War I to the fall of the USSR and the rise of the European Union. Several case-studies help students understand the legacy of the 20th century and the problems we face today.


HIST 334, The American West

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The history of the American West up to the present. Exploration and conquest,the movement of peoples, the role of the federal government, rural and urban development, resource use, issues of race and ethnicity, gender and class, as well as the “idea” of the West.


HIST 342, American Popular Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The history of American popular culture, with primary focus on the twentieth century. Examines such subjects as film, television, music, and print media.


HIST 343, Atomic America: The Cultural History of Nuclear Technology in the United States

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The history of nuclear technology in the United States. Explores the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of atomic energy, with particular emphasis given to changing images in popular culture. May include guest speakers and field trips to the Trinity Site and the National Atomic Museum.


HIST 345, The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The Bolshevik Revolution, the development of Stalinist totalitarianism,reform under Khrushchev, the “stagnation” era of Brezhnev, and the end of the “great experiment” with Gorbachev.


HIST 348, War and Society

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The political, economic, social, and ideological implications of warfare.


HIST 376, Mass Violence through the Ages

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
This course examines the nature and dynamics of mass violence and aggression, and their impact on politics and societies. Through lectures and readings the students explore and compare political, sociological and psychological dimensions of genocides, state terror, and ethnic cleansing.


HIST 380, Technology in America

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The role technology has played in American history since colonial times,focusing on the relationship of technology to American culture and the changing role of technologies and technological systems in a modern industrial society


HIST 385, Latin American Cultural History

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Overview of the cultural history of the Iberian world on both sides of the Atlantic from the earliest cultural expression to the current Hispanic presence in the United States. Multicultural creations of Hispanic societies. Cultural productions, i.e., fiestas, toreo, music, painting, literature, graffiti—in their political, economic, and historical background. (Same as SPAN 385)


HIST 386, Introduction to The Middle East

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: at least one 100 level history course or equivalent, English 112
The course is a general introduction to the history of the area known as the Fertile Crescent, with a focus on the political, ethnic, religious, and socio-economic policies of the principal states of the region.


HIST 387, Eastern Europe In The 20th Century

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: At least one 100‐level history course or equivalent; ENGL 112
The course explores major political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in the “Lands Between”—the Baltic States, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, and Albania—with particular attention to politics, economics, and culture.


HIST 421, The Age of Radical Ideologies

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
The theory and practice of nationalism, anarchism, communism, and fascism in the 19th and 20th centuries.


HIST 448, The Cold War

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Senior‐level seminar examining the history of the Cold War.


HIST 466, Historical Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
This seminar explores the genre of historical fiction, examining several historical fiction novels and shorter works


HIST 467, Film Genres

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Writing intensive senior-level seminar. Examines a selected film genre (e.g. film noir, westerns, science fiction) in depth.


HIST 472, Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3


HIST 491, Directed Studies

Credit Hours: TBA
Prerequisites: senior standing or consent of instructor


Humanities Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


HUMA 301, Practical Creativity

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor

May be applied by philosophy minors toward the requirement for 18 credit hours in philosophy. An investigation of factors impacting creativity (discipline, time-pressure, constraints), conceptions of creativity (play, inspiration, complex adaptive systems), and applications of creativity (problem solving, negotiation, art).


HUMA 311, Shakespeare and Music

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
An interdisciplinary study of selected works of Shakespeare through a musical lens. Shakespeare’s plays were written to be spoken and heard, and this course explores the parallel issues of choice and constraint in the acts of speaking and hearing Shakespeare’s words, applying tools commonly used to facilitate the performance and reception of music


HUMA 481, Capstone Seminar

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: Senior Standing and must have completed at least 12 credit hours in Humanities/Social Science courses.
Topic varies. An interdisciplinary, team-taught, upper-division seminar. Students will examine the topic from a wide variety of perspectives and consider how it relates to their chosen field of study/profession. May include a final project that will be reviewed by an advisor from the student’s major department.


Music & Music Performance Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core


MUS 105, Fundamentals of Music

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the basic materials of music: tones, rhythm, notation, singing, and composition. [NMCCNS MUSI 1113: General Education Area V]


MUS 110, Music Appreciation

Credit Hours: 3 A listening-intensive study of rhythm, melody, and musical structure in Western and other music from antiquity to the present. [NMCCNS MUSI 1113: General Education V]


MUS 201, Comprehensive Musicianship I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 105 or consent of instructor
A detailed study of notation, keys, scales, intervals, chords, clefs, and transpositions. Practical application to keyboard, instruments, and voice.


MUS 301, Composition

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112
An introduction to the structural principles of music composition. Students will use software tools to study patterns in existing compositions and then create several computer-based compositions within specific design constraints. Final project compositions will be presented in public performance. Prior music background not required.


MUS 311, Opera

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 105, or consent of the instructor
A musical and socio-historical exploration of selected great operatic works.


MUS 401, Interconnections of Music and Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: MUS 105, or consent of instructor
A discussion of elements connecting music and science in theory and practice. Readings will be selected from a variety of contemporary musicological, scientific, and philosophical sources.

 

Music Performance Courses: 

These courses are “offered on demand,” i.e. when a sufficient  number of students want to enroll, and they may be taken for  elective credit only. These courses can be repeated for credit as  determined by the instructor. These courses may NOT be used  to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core  Curriculum


MUS 171, 172, Beginning Group Voice

Credit Hours: 1
Basic techniques of correct singing


MUS 273, 274, Intermediate Group Voice

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 171, 172, or consent of instructor
Development of personal vocal technique, musicianship, diction.


MUS 331–332, Chamber Choir

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor


MUS 333–334, Concert Chorus

Credit Hours: 1
The Concert Chorus performs large-scale choral works independently and together with the Chamber Orchestra. Interested students without prior singing experience are encouraged to participate.


MUS 341–342, Jazz Ensemble

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor


MUS 351–352, Chamber Orchestra

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor


MUS 361–362, Chamber Music

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor


MUS 377, 378, Vocal Performance

Credit Hours: 1
Prerequisites: MUS 273, 274, or consent of instructor
Practical and theoretical aspects of solo vocal performance.


Philosophy

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum


PHIL 120, Freshman Seminar In Philosophy

Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of major issues and approaches in the history and practice of philosophy, including questions of value, knowledge,reality, and problems that arise in social and political philosophy. A fundamental aim of the course is to improve skills in critical thinking, problem-solving, and evaluating.


PHIL 231, Western Philosophy

Credit Hours: 3
Introduction to Western philosophical methods, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and major philosophers in comparison to one major Asian philosophy text such as the Tao Te Ching. [NMCCNS PHIL 1113: General Education Area V]


PHIL 300, Philosophy of Science

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the philosophical bases and problems of the formal and empirical sciences.Includes the nature of scientific methods, problems and paradoxes of induction, logic of explanation, concepts of causality, determinism and probability, measurement theory, and special philosophical issues in physical, biological, and behavioral sciences.

 

PHIL 315, Philosophy of Digital Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
A philosophical and historical overview of the shift to digital modes of communication; explores the impact of this digital shift on culture, identity, communication, education, art, medicine, ethics, community, and the production of knowledge. (Same as TC 315.)


PHIL 321, Professional Ethics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Ethical theories and their applications in business, research, and engineering.


PHIL 323, American Nature Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
A survey of American nature writers, such as Lewis and Clark, Thoreau, Edward Abbey, and Leslie Marmon Silko, with literary and philosophical analysis of their observational, documentary, rhetorical, inter-disciplinary, and self-reflective strategies to develop students’ own skills in these areas and to produce their own nature writing. (Same as ENGL 323)


PHIL 342, Philosophy of Bioethics

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Exploration of ethical issues embedded in medicine and related activities; focuses on broad areas including: the physician/patient relationship, the media’s influence on medicine, the role of the pharmaceutical industry, gene therapy, cloning and stem cell research, organ transplantation, human and animal research, reproductive technologies, and the global allocation of resources.


PHIL 351, World Religions

Credit Hours:3
Prerequisites: ENGL 112 or consent of instructor
Survey of the theologies of Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and other religions. [NMCCNS PHIL 1113: General Education Area V]


PHIL 352, Asian Philosophy

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Survey of the philosophical traditions of China (Confucianism and Taoism), India (Hinduism and Islam), and Japan (Buddhism).


PHIL 421, Periods or Figures in Philosophy

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Study of a single philosopher’s work or a philosophical school

 

PHIL 440, Philosophical Novels

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 and one PHIL course
Exploration of the use and articulation of philosophy in novels. (Same as ENGL 440)


PHIL 451, American Philosophy

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
Survey of American philosophy, including pragmatism from its roots in American Romantic writers such as Emerson to contemporary figures such as Richard Rorty and Stanley Fish, nature philosophers such as Thoreau and Ed Abbey, feminist philosophy, and Native-American philosophy.


Political Science Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 4: Social Sciences of the General Education Core Curriculum


PS 151, Introduction to Political Science

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to political ideas, events and institutions. Explores the relationships between politics and society; examines the interdependence of citizenship and community life; investigates the complex interaction between values, issues and political behavior.


PS 171, American Government

Credit Hours: 3
An examination of American democracy as a creative, evolving, and fluid process; how citizens and political institutions interact ot create power, establish rights, and pursue interests.[NMCCNS GOVT 1113: General Education Area IV]


PS 361, Issues in International Relations

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: PS 171 or one semester of college history or consent of instructor
Considers current international issues in light of the transforming structure of world politics; examines the changing status of America as a world power; and investigates the roles of culture, economic power, and technology in the process of global change.


PS 370, Public Policy Making

Credit Hours: 3
An analytical examination of the policymaking process within the American political system, with special attention to who is involved in the process, how decisions are made, and what the consequences are of alternative policy choices.


Social Science

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 4: Social Sciences of the General Education Core Curriculum


SS 120, Social Thought

Credit Hours: 3
From Machiavelli and Marx to Steinem and Foucault, this course explores some of the major historical and contemporary theoretical works and authors in selected social sciences. The focus is on the cultural framework in which these thoughts emerged and the impact they had on society. (Same and ANTH 120 andWGS 120)


SS 301, Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
An introduction to the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), including techniques for problem definition, functional modeling, and concept generation. Emphasis on qualitative, interdisciplinary approaches to technical problems.


Spanish Courses

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of the General Education Core Curriculum

 

SPAN 113, Elementary Spanish I

Credit Hours: 3
Elements of Spanish, with emphasis on the spoken language. Grammar and writing are introduced in connection with the subjects of oral practice. [NMCCNS SPAN 1113: General Education Area V]


SPAN 113N, Spanish for Native Speakers

Credit Hours: 3
Elements of Spanish, with emphasis on the spoken and written language. Grammar and writing are introduced in connection with the subjects of oral practice.


SPAN 114, Elementary Spanish II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 113 or equivalent
Continuation of SPAN 113. [NMCCNS SPAN 1123: General Education Area V]


SPAN 215, Intermediate Spanish I

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 214 or equivalent
Expansion of vocabulary through conversation. Stress is placed on the correction of vocabulary and speech for native speakers. Extensive readings from literary models provide materials for emphasis on the principles of composition. Review of grammar


SPAN 216, Intermediate Spanish II

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 215 or equivalent
Continuation of SPAN 215; readings in Spanish literature.


SPAN 352, Contemporary Latin American Novel

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 215 or equivalent
Survey of the 20th century Latin American regional novel. How contemporary writers have portrayed the Latin American continent: social-realism, surrealism, the boom, neo-baroque, magical realism, mestizaje, social-protest, negrismo, etc. Focus on reading classical works such as Arguedas, Asturias, Castellanos, Fuentes ,Roa Bastos ,Rulfo. All Readings and reports to be in Spanish. (Same as ENGL 352)


SPAN 355, Latin American Fiction & the Arts

Credit Hours: 3
A historical journey of a multi-cultural continent. Politics, economic disparity, military dictatorship, oppression and revolutionary resistance are studied through the lens of arts and literature. The most varied styles—social-realism, surrealism, fantasy, magical-realism, etc.—complement factual history to offer an accurate picture of a cruel social reality. (Same as ENGL 355)


SPAN 357, Latin American Literature

Credit Hours: 3
A review of Latin American literary production with examples of its cultural and artistic diversity. The class examines the most important writers from Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America,the Andean region and the Southern cone, and relates their poetic legacy to the social sciences and philosophy. (Same as ENGL 357)


SPAN 370, Nahuat Mythology & Anthropology

Credit Hours: 3
A study of Native language, literature, and mythology of Central America. The class explores a specific native literature in its own language and discusses an “American” worldview. Topics include the concept of a fragmented self and of multiple souls, of political community and redistribution, a quintesimal (5) and vigesimal (20) system of counting, sexuality, and the foundation of a Native philosophy. (Same as ANTH 370)


SPAN 385, Latin American Cultural History

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: SPAN 215 or equivalent
Overview of the cultural history of the Iberian world on both sides of the Atlantic from the earliest cultural expression to the current Hispanic presence in the United States. Multicultural creations of Hispanic societies. Cultural productions, i.e., fiestas, toreo, music, painting, literature, graffiti—in their political, economic, and historical background. All readings and reports to be in Spanish. (Same as HIST 385)


Technical Communication Courses

TC 100, Community Service

Credit Hours: 1
Proposing and then reporting in writing on a semester-long community service activity with any nonprofit organization. To be graded S/U. May be repeated for credit.

 

TC 101, Orientation to Technical Communication

Credit Hours: 1
Guest speakers introduce students to the myriad activities and career paths of technical communicators.


TC 151, Visual Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Students are introduced to the significance of visual symbols in human communication. They learn fundamental graphic and document design principles, develop a vocabulary for analyzing the rhetoric, ethics, and politics of images, and apply this knowledge to the production of effective technical visuals.


TC 202, Elements of Editing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 112; TC151 pre- or co-requisite or consent of instructor
Grammar review. Description of types and levels of editing. Responsibilities of editors. Use of editing and proofreading symbols, usage guides, style guides, and style sheets. Production aspects of editing. Practice in online and hardcopy editing of short manuscripts.


TC 211, Media Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112
Survey of media of mass communication, including print, television, film, and internet. Emphasis on social impact of media and on developing tools to examine media messages. Students will form research groups to present on and analyze selected media events.

 

TC 305, Science Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: ENGL 112 and at least junior standing or consent of instructor
This course provides an overview of science writing genres designed to reach multiple audiences (e.g., specialists, policymakers, students, the public, etc.). Course topics include, but are not limited to, the rhetorical history of science communication, popular science writing and science journalism, public information for research groups and facilities (e.g., press releases, websites, science blogs), and scholarly writing (e.g., journal articles, and grant proposals). This course is ideal for TC students interested in working for one of New Mexico’s many national labs and research facilities and for students in the sciences interested in improving their scientific communication skills.

 

TC 315, Philosophy of Digital Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: English 112 or consent of instructor
A philosophical and historical overview of the shift to digital modes of communication; explores the impact of this digital shift on culture, identity, communication, education, art, medicine, ethics, community, and the production of knowledge. (Same as PHIL 315.)

 

TC 316, International Professional Communication

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: ENGL 112 or consent of instructor
Producing efficient and effective information for audiences situated in different geographic locations is a major concern of companies and organizations, both large and small. This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to analyze and solve the problems posed by a world that is increasingly diverse, interconnected, and driven by knowledge, technology and the capacity to learn and adapt to new and ever changing contexts and situations. During the course, students will produce artifacts that demonstrate development and accomplishments as an international professional communicator.

 

TC 321, Internship

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202, TC 211, ENGL 341 and consent of TC faculty
Work during a school term or the summer in a technical communication or media field, such as writing, gathering data, or production work,for an on- or off-campus publications agency. To receive credit, students must have their internships approved in advance by the TC faculty. Students produce a report about their internship program.


TC 351, Web Design

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 151
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of web design, including principles of usability, aesthetics, and interactivity. Students will learn and apply current web design theories and relevant technology tools to practical course projects.

 

TC 361, Advanced visual communication: Data visualization

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: ENGL 112 or consent of instructor.
Knowing how to communicate information graphically and in such a way as to intuitively engage its audiences is a fundamental skill to have in a world permeated by data. This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate, plan and produce aesthetic, ethical, and functional data displays—graphs, charts, technical illustrations, maps, interactive displays, and others—for people engaged in science, technology, business, government, and academia, as well as for semi-specialized and lay audiences.

 

TC 371, Publications Management

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202 and 211 or consent of instructor
Theory and practice of meeting managerial responsibilities. Topics include communication in organizations, management and supervision, project management, technology and professional communication, legal and ethical issues, and contract employment. Includes a collaborative research project using ethnographic methods.


TC 381, Studying Organizational Cultures

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202 and 211 or consent of instructor
Learning the practice and process of participant observations within the cultures of organizations. Exploring the differences within cultures and writing those observations as narratives.


TC 402, Comprehensive Technical Editing

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202 and ENGL 341
Working with full-length drafts, the course applies theory to problems in evaluating,revising, and designing documents, working with authors in different organizational settings, and writing and designing for international audiences. Course includes a research project and presentation.


TC 411, Persuasive Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202 and 211, or consent of instructor
Theory and practice of producing proposals, sales literature, application letters, résumés, and other documents and media that promote the interest of individuals or organizations in industry and government. Topics in psychology, rhetoric, and advertising may be considered. Students gain practical experience in design, writing, and illustrating promotional texts, particularly technical proposals.


TC 420, Senior Seminar

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:TC 211 and senior standing in the Technical Communication program
Readings in professional journals and discussion of current issues in technical and professional communication. Taught as a seminar with students presenting papers. Research leading to proposal for TC 422, Senior Thesis


TC 421, Professional Writing Workshop

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 202 and 211, or consent of instructor
Emphasis on the development and writing processes of professional communication documents, which might include computer/software documentation, websites, videos, policy and procedural manuals. Students gain practical experience working on an in-depth documentation project with clients and developing materials for users.


TC 422, Senior Thesis

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC 420
Initiation, production, and presentation (oral and written) of an original research project in technical communication.


TC 461, Digital Media Design

Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: TC351 or consent of TC faculty
This course builds on the skills students learn in Web Design, providing the necessary tools and experience to build large-scale complex websites and applications. Through the course text, lectures, hands-on projects, and self-paced tutorials, students will explore and learn how to appropriately select from the many technological options available for designing large-scale digital projects.


TC 491, Directed Studies

Credit Hours: 1 - 3, TBA
Prerequisites: TC 202 and 211, or consent of instructor

 

Theater Courses:

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 5: Humanities of  the General Education Core Curriculum 


THEA 314, Introduction to Theater

Credit Hours: 3
Theory and practice of analysis of the play as literature, applying basic modes of literary criticism and vocabulary of literary analysis. Coursework includes organizing and leading a discussion on such subjects as literary analysis, directing, scene or costume design, or playwriting. Practical application includes producing a readers’ theatre performance. 


Women’s and Gender Studies

The following courses may be used to fulfill Area 4: Social  Sciences of the General Education Core Curriculum 


WGS 101, Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit Hours: 3
This chronologically organized course follows the changes in defining women and men as gendered beings in the U.S. We explore such cultural areas as the economy, politics, sexualities, medicine, religions, and more, tracing how ideas of femininity and masculinity are created and enforced in various areas of American culture.


WGS 120, Social Thought

Credit Hours: 3
From Machiavelli and Marx to Steinem and Foucault, this course explores some of the major historical and contemporary theoretical works and authors in selected social sciences. The focus is on the cultural framework in which these thoughts emerged and the impact they had on society. (Same as ANTH 120 and SS 120)


WGS 301, Introduction to Women's Studies

Credit Hours: 3
This thematically organized course introduces issues important to women and men as gendered beings. Explorations of such cultural areas as the economy, politics, sexualities, medicine, religions, and more, both in their American context as well as in comparison to other cultures.


WGS 320, Anthropology of Sex and Gender

Credit Hours: 3
A survey of the varieties of sex and gender definitions and roles in historical and contemporary human cultures. The study of sex assignment, gender definitions and roles in their association to stratified or equitable access to economic, political, and ideological resources and monopolies. Exploration of the parallels and differences between gender, race, and class. Topics include: gendered division of labor, female and male socialization, violence against women as male entertainment and female punishment, gender universals and generalities. (Same as ANTH 320)


WGS 381, Qualitative Methods

Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the primary methods used in long-term qualitative data gathering, such as participant observation and deep ethnography, and in short-term applied data collection, such as focus groups and life histories. A major focus is research conducted with organizations and their culture. Students will design and execute their own research projects. (Same as ANTH 381 and TC 381)


Graduate Courses

The following courses are offered for graduate credit.


COMM 560, Professional Public Speaking

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
Theory and practice of ethical and professional speech communication. Research, writing and presenting professional presentations. Designing and using effective visuals, including posters and electronic presentation aids. Conducting group presentations and discussions about ethical and cross-curriculum issues in historical, cultural and workplace context. Design, schedule and present a formal research colloquium.

 

COMM 570, Communication in Engineering

Credit Hours: cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisite: Graduate enrollment in Engineering
Advanced communication writing courses linked to engineering disciplines, focusing on graduate and professional genres (e.g., conference abstracts, journal articles, and conference presentations). Emphasis on communicating technical information to a variety of audiences.

 

COMM 575, Communication in the Sciences

Credit Hours: cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisite: Graduate enrollment in Sciences
Advanced communication writing courses linked to science disciplines, focusing on graduate and professional genres (e.g., conference abstracts, journal articles, and conference presentations). Emphasis on communicating technical information to a variety of audiences.


ENGL 501, Graduate Writing Seminar

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Proficiency in written and spoken English, Graduate standing or consent of instructor
Intensive practice in academic writing for graduate students. Focuses on writing and revision. Reviews the history and development of science writing and surveys the professional environments in which scientists are expected to publish. Students should come with a draft of a substantial piece of work—such as an article, chapter, or grant proposal.


ENGL 511, Graduate Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
Professional‐level writing in fiction, poetry, creative non‐fiction or plays. Focuses on the genre of the student’s choice. Students write often,revise frequently, learn and apply methods of Creative Writing instruction.

 

ENGL 524, Ecotopia: The Intersection of Science and Literature

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs [co-taught with ENGL 324]
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Utopian literature, whether Paradise myths or novels set on an idyllic island or in the future, chronicles human aspirations for a better society. Ecotopia—a neologism coined in 1968—combines utopian desires for better relationships between humans with more recent desires and need for a better relationship with the environment. The course provides a review of utopian literature throughout history and focuses on contemporary science fiction novels and developments in architecture, technology, science, and alternative social structures. Extra work is required for graduate credit.

 

PHIL 521, Professional Ethics

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Introduce students to the concepts, theory, and practice of ethics and effective written and oral communications. Study cases and apply classical moral theory to decisions encountered in professional careers.

 

SS 501, Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or consent of instructor
An introduction to the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), including techniques for problem definition,functional modeling, and concept generation. Emphasis on qualitative, interdisciplinary approaches to technical problems. Application of TRIZskills to graduate student peers’ design and/or experimental problems.


SPAN 520, Advanced Spanish Reading & Comprehension

Credit Hours: 1 cr, 1cl hr
Creative writing in Spanish. The class explores the poetic and musical legacy of the Spanish speaking countries, and writes poems, short stories, or a small literary piece in Spanish.

 

TC 505, Science Writing

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: graduate standing
This course provides an overview of science writing genres designed to reach multiple audiences (e.g., specialists, policymakers, students, the public) and is useful both to students pursuing a career as a professional science or technical writer and to students in the sciences hoping to improve their communication skills. Course topics include, but are not limited to, popular science writing (e.g., writing for mainstream magazines and newspapers), public information (e.g., press releases, websites, science blogs, informational videos), and academic/research writing (e.g., journal articles, abstracts, and grant proposals). This course will also include a community service project providing students with an opportunity to generate real-world documents for a research facility at New Mexico Tech. Extra work is required for graduate credit.


TC 511, Persuasive Communication

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor
Instruction in theories and practices of effective persuasive communication. Course content will include extensive audience analysis and planning, drafting, and revising persuasive documents, with a heavy emphasis on funding and research proposals, for targeted audiences.

 

TC 512, International Professional Communication

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Producing efficient and effective information for audiences situated in different geographic locations is a major concern of companies and organizations, both large and small. This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to analyze and solve the problems posed by a world that is increasingly diverse, interconnected, and driven by knowledge, technology and the capacity to learn and adapt to new and ever changing contexts and situations. During the course, students will produce artifacts that demonstrate development and accomplishments as an international professional communicator. Extra work is required for graduate credit.

 

TC 521, Professional Writing Workshop

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Emphasis on the development and writing processes of professional communication documents, which might include computer software documentation, websites, videos, policy and procedural manuals. Students gain practical experience working on an in-depth documentation project with clients and developing materials for users.

 

TC 561, Data visualization

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor
Knowing how to communicate information graphically and in such a way as to intuitively engage its audiences is a fundamental skill to have in a world permeated by data. This course develops the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate, plan and produce aesthetic, ethical, and functional data displays—graphs, charts, technical illustrations, maps, interactive displays, and others—for people engaged in science, technology, business, government, and academia, as well as for semi- specialized and lay audiences. Extra work is required for graduate credit.

 

TC 589, Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs

 

THEA 514, Introduction to Theater

Credit Hours: 3 cr, 3 cl hrs
Theory and practice of analysis of the play as literature, applying basic modes of literary criticism and vocabulary of literary analysis. Coursework includes organizing and leading a discussion on such subjects as literary analysis, directing, scene or costume design, or playwriting. Practical application includes producing a readers’ theatre performance.

 

Music Program

 

The New Mexico Tech Music Program offers lecture courses and performance ensembles and supports student music-related clubs and activities on campus. Music ensembles rehearse and perform in the recital hall of the Jean Macey Music Annex, which also houses two practice rooms available for student use. Performance opportunities vary from semester to semester and are based on student demand and available staffing.

 

Piano Courses

[video, centered]

New Mexico Tech Music Performance Program, by Gaby Benalil

For those that already know how to ready music and would like to sign up for Piano, I recommend signing up for Piano II or Piano III.

We work with:

  • Scales, Arpeggios, Hanon, Czerny op. 599, Suzuki Piano Vol. 1, 2
  • Leila Fletcher vol. 2, 3; Classical Music , Keith Snell Vol. 2
Piano I:
  • Leila Fletcher Vol.1, Keith Snell Etude, Baroque, Romantic, Vol1; Hanon, Suzuki vol.1

 

For Strings

If you never ever played a string instrument, but you know how to read music, you can start on Beginning Strings I. After level I, we will move faster to learn how to play using the whole fingerboard, applied technique.

 

Vocal Studio

For Vocal Studio, we will work on Bel Canto breathing technique - it is the school that I came from and where I did my master's; it is the same technique:

  • Applied technique
  • Physiology - how to know and use your vocal instrument the proper way
  • Songs for the 16th and 17th centuries
  • Lieder
  • Chanson
  • Duets, Trios
  • Folk songs
  • and your choice of songs.

 

Chamber Music

We have for the Fall 2014 semester:

  • Instrumental
  • Lieder

 

Chamber Choir

This Fall, we will be working on The Messiah, by Handel. Please invite all Handel lovers to come and join and sing with us!!

 

Opera

In the Opera course, we will be learning the history of Opera and be working on Mozart's Opera!! It's open for everyone that would like to try singing opera, even if you have never sung!!

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Gaby Benalil.

Thank You.

 

Summer and Fall courses

Summer 2014

CRN72346 CED 335C-01 Vocal Studio, Tuesday 12:00-13:50 pm
CRN72533 CED 336C-01 Piano Accompaniment, Tuesday 11:00-11:50 am*
CRN72342 CED 340C-01 Cello, Tuesday 2:00-3:20pm
CRN72523 CED 344C-01 Strings III/IV, Monday 8:00-9:50 am
CRN72522 CED 342C-01 Beginning Strings I/II, Monday 14:00-15:50pm
CRN72341 CED 330C-01 Piano I/II, Monday 12:00-13:50pm
CRN72447 CED 330C-02 Piano III/IV, 10:00-11:50am

* For those signing up for Vocal Studio, Strings I, II, III, IV, Cello, please also sign up for Piano Accompaniment also. Please Sign Up to work on your solo pieces.

During the Summer, we will have a Workshop to learn how to take care of your Music Instrument!!

 

Fall 2014

56871 MUS 311-01 Wednesday 5:00-8:00pm Opera
56748 MUS 332-01 Tuesday 5;00-7:00pm Chamber Choir
56872 MUS 361-01 MW 12:00-2:00 Chamber Music
56691 MUS 351-01 Monday 5:00-7:00pm Chamber Orchestra
57407 CED 316C-01 Tuesday 1300-1350 Music Theory
56791 CED 330C-01 Monday 19:00-20:15 Piano I, II, III, IV, V
57002 CED 330C-02 Monday 3:30-5:00pm Piano III, IV
57160 CED 335C-02 Tuesday 14:00-14:50
57434 CED 336C-01 Tuesday 15:00-15:50 Piano Accompaniment
57479 CED 340C-02 Tuesday 16:00-16:50 Beginning Strings I, II, III
57408 CED 342C-01 Tuesday 19:00-20:15 Beginning Strings I, II, III, IV, V

 

Department Chair
Dr. Steve Simpson
ssimpson@nmt.edu

Department Secretary
Liza Apache
lapache@nmt.edu
Department of Communication, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
Fitch Hall
801 Leroy Place
Socorro, NM 87801

Phone: 575-835-5445     Fax: 575-835-5544